Rediscovering a Friend

In life we meet many people that we like to refer to as “friends”, but the truth is that often we don’t take the time to really get to know them. This happened to me with an old colleague from business school. We were two of approximately 171 women in a graduating class of 780. Although we were “friends” we were more like comrades sharing an experience, supportive of each other yet not close enough to fully understand each other’s personal story. After graduation we both went our separate ways and lost contact. After 24 years I would have the opportunity to reconnect with Vera. She had just published a book and shared the information with some of her classmates. So, this summer I read her book and rediscovered an old friend in the process. After completing the book I knew I had to speak to Vera to fully understand the inspiration behind her novel, The Lonely American. Though it was written as fiction, I suspected there was much of Vera herself interwoven in the story, and it sparked a desire, almost a need to learn more. I spent three hours with Vera on the phone, not only catching up on life, but also delving into the historical period of her book from her perspective.

The Lonely American by Vera Lam

The Lonely American by Vera Lam

Vera was born and raised in Saigon, now known as Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. So naturally she chose to write a book inspired by her personal experiences with the Vietnam War, a time period that is of particular interest to me. To clarify, in Vietnam, “The Vietnam War” is referred to as “The American War”. Like many, I grew up in the 1960’s with current events of the Vietnam War playing out in television news and the papers yet I understood very little of it. Reading about the war in Stanley Karnow’s Pulitzer Prize winning book, Vietnam: A History, was an eye opener. It helped me understand the context, the players, and the actions of a war. When Vera told us about her new book, I was delighted to hear the news, and at the same time intrigued by the subject. The Lonely American delineates the life of an American pilot and his kindred connections to Vietnam. After serving two tours of duty, he returns to the US as a fully decorated officer. He marries his pre-war American sweetheart and has a son. However, he never forgets a woman he had met during his Vietnam years. Years later, as his treacherous life has driven him to complete solitude, he rediscovers his special love and connections to Vietnam. I don’t want to give the story away but suffice to say that it is a story that could have and may have happened to many. The characters personify the true historical experiences that so many have lived.

I wanted to dig deeper and asked Vera about her own personal story. As we spoke on the phone, I listened intently and scribbled pages and pages of notes. Listening to Vera’s story was like reading a novel. I appreciated her openness. Although she was happy for me to share her story I have respected her request to omit some of the events due to their delicate nature. After listening to Vera’s life experience I have a newfound respect and admiration for her.

The United States supported South Vietnam in their fight against communist North Vietnam. In January of 1973 all parties finally agreed to a cease-fire. The United States pulled its troops out leaving South Vietnam to deal with its fate. Many South Vietnamese refugees chose to leave their country when the US left. But leaving the country would become increasingly difficult especially if you did not have money or connections. Soon after, North Vietnam broke the cease-fire and resumed fighting, continuing its push to the south. South Vietnam, with no military aid from the US, was forced to surrender in 1975. In 1976, the country was officially united and called the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. This caused another exodus of South Vietnamese who chose to leave rather than live under communist regime.

So while I navigated the dramas of middle school and high school, watched The Six Million Dollar Man on television, and listened to Simon & Garfunkel on the radio, Vera was figuring out ways to leave Saigon in 1975. Since her father had been an ‘under cover special agent’ in South Vietnam for the Republic of China for more than two decades, he was blacklisted by the North Vietnamese. Though he had narrowly escaped by boat to the neighboring country of Thailand, Vera’s mother and her siblings were left behind. They were subsequently placed under house arrest for several months. In time, Vera obtained a pass that allowed her to leave communist Vietnam and move to Paris. After having lived through the aftermath of the war and all of its insecurities, Vera understood the importance and need for establishing “security” in her life. She decided it was time to go to America to study engineering. She believed education was the equalizer in society. In 1979, with her unstoppable resolve, Vera moved to LA and began her studies in a community college. In 1981, Vera’s family finally joined her in the United States. She would go on to win a full scholarship to the University of Southern California where she earned a degree in computer engineering in 1984. After graduating from USC, Vera started working for AT&T Bell Laboratories. Soon after, Vera’s path would cross with mine. She and I met in Boston at Harvard Business School in 1988. After graduating from HBS, she would go on to have a very successful career in business. And lucky for us that she would get inspired to write “The Lonely American”.

In writing her book, Vera wanted to express the “things” that are important to her. She wanted to remind people of the horrors of war because as she says, “we have such short memories”. In June of 2014 the UN Refugee Agency reported that the number of refugees, asylum-seekers, and internally displaced people worldwide due to conflicts exceeded 50 million people for the first time since the end of World War II. Pulling a direct quote from her book, “Bullets have no eyes”, Vera wanted to remind us that many of the victims of war are the innocent bystanders. She iterated the importance of our understanding foreign policy because it will undoubtedly impact us one way or another. Towards the end of our telephone conversation, Vera mentioned that she had bore grudges against her own family members, but later recognized the power of forgiving.

I am very impassioned with the topic of mentoring others and serving as a role model. My “rediscovered” friend is a true inspiration for the next generation. She is an inspiration, not just for young women, but also for all young people around the world living in conflict. Vera’s determination proves to us once again that we are the ones that make the choices in our lives that can alter our destiny in a positive way.

I invite you to read “The Lonely American” by Vera Lam, my friend. http://www.amazon.com/The-Lonely-American-Vera-Lam/dp/9573909111/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1410626853&sr=8-2&keywords=the+lonely+american

The UN Refugee Agency Report June 2014 http://www.unhcr.org/53a155bc6.html

For historical background read Stanley Karnow’s Vietnam A History http://www.amazon.com/Vietnam-History-Stanley-Karnow/dp/0140265473/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415295380&sr=8-1&keywords=stanley+karnows

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Happy Mother’s Day to My Friend Consuelo

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I met Consuelo two years ago when I first moved to London. The name “Consuelo” means comfort or consolation in Spanish. We met while walking our dogs in our neighborhood. She is a nanny for a family with two children and a handsome black Labrador Retriever. Her dog and mine took an instant liking to each other. Her dog is 11 years old and still looks very youthful. Consuelo shared that the secret for her dog’s youthful look and good health was that she had fed him freshly cooked chicken and rice since he was a puppy. Spoiled boy!  Consuelo shared that she had moved from her native Ecuador to London over 30 years ago. So we had always chatted in Spanish. Over the months, we would run into each other with our dogs. Most of the time Consuelo would be pushing a stroller with an adorable little girl who is now 3 years old. One weekend afternoon I ran into Consuelo with the family that she works for and I found out that their older son had severe disabilities. Consuelo also cared for this little boy.

The months would go by and we would continue to meet each other and share pleasantries on the street. Then Friday morning was a special day. I was on my way to a coffee gathering when I ran into her with the little girl. We said our hellos and the cute little girl who recognizes me gave me a huge smile. It turned out we were walking in the same direction so off we went to the St. John’s Wood high street and chatted for about 15 minutes.

She would share so much in just those 15 minutes. She would open up in such a way that even she surprised herself. I asked how the little boy that she watches was. She said he was doing ok. She shared that it is always so challenging to take care of his needs. It is an exhausting job for both the parents and Consuelo. I told her I so admired her patience in dealing with the boy. My friend commented that she is always so concerned when they hire a babysitter for when Consuelo cannot be there. Consuelo will review a thousand things with the new sitter to ensure he is well taken care of. You can tell she is very protective of him. One day last week, Consuelo was preparing the boy for a bath. The boy is about 7 or 8 years old. As Consuelo lifted him to put him in his bath, he turned his face, and he placed his open mouth on her cheek in what appeared to be an attempt to kiss her. She was so moved because it was his first attempt at kissing and of showing any signs of affection. Consuelo could not believe it, and even as she recounted the story she was filled with goose bumps. The little boy had not even done this with his own mother. I said to Consuelo, “That little boy loves you so much. He must sense and recognize your dedication to him.” The outside world only sees the boy’s disabilities and suffering, while Consuelo focuses on improving his quality of life while showering him with love and affection.

Consuelo then shared that she and her husband were expecting a grandchild. I congratulated her and asked if it was their first one. She said it wasn’t but that it was the first girl and she was obviously very excited. She said her oldest grandson was 11 years old. She was delighted to share that her grandson had just been awarded a full scholarship for the rest of his education in London. She commented that the family was very pleased with this since her son had limited financial resources. As we walked further, she turned and said, “You see my son is disabled, he’s been in a wheel chair since he was a child”. She went on to tell me some wonderful stories about her son and how he has tried to live independently and support his family. I asked her if he was the reason why they had left Ecuador and she said yes. Her son would not have had much of a future in her native country back then.

I turned to Consuelo and I said something like, “Dios te escogió para este labor por una razón muy especial”, which translates into “God hand picked you for this task for a very special reason”. I could not get over the fact that after raising her own disabled child she would find the fortitude and patience to repeat the whole experience all over again by helping raise another family’s child with special needs.

We arrived at the high street and were getting ready to say our goodbyes. But she had one more story to share. She told me how her son had adapted a vehicle that allowed him to store his wheel chair on the roof and was therefore able to drive everywhere. It pleases him very much that he can transport his own family. You could sense how proud she is of her son. No doubt her son gets a lot of his “can do” attitude from his mother who through her example taught him to never give up. Consuelo continues to share this love and perseverance with the children she watches. And in return those children adore her not just as a caregiver or nanny but also more like a grandmother. Not to mention the family dog who also adores her because she showers him with love and attention too, oh and with freshly cooked chicken and rice, as well!

My heart filled with such joy to have met Consuelo and to have run into her on that particular Friday morning. I turned to her and said, “I must hug you”, and I did. She thanked me for listening to her and said she shared these stories with me because she felt I was a special person. I was very moved. We said “Hasta Luego” (See You Later) and went in our different directions. It may be the last time I run into her since I will be moving back to the US. I often wonder why people’s paths cross. I like to think that it is not just coincidence but that somehow it is meant to be, that there is a reason for it. Even if it is just to say, I am so proud to have known such a special person and role model like Consuelo.

Happy Mother’s Day

Colombian Kheema Matar

 

Kheema Matar – Ground (Minced) Meat and Peas

A Story of Food, Friendship, and Finicky Eaters

When we lived in Westport, CT one of our dearest and closest friends were from India. We spent countless evenings talking, laughing, dancing, drinking, and mainly eating. Some gatherings were planned and others were very spontaneous. We would telephone each other and the next thing we knew we would have planned a feast of Indian, Colombian, and/or American foods with whatever ingredients were in our houses. The beauty of having friends from different cultures is that as we get to know each other we come to the realization that we have much more in common than we think. As my girlfriend and I cooked together we realized how similar Colombian and Indian food was. Sure, there were differences, but more often than not, she would identify a Colombian dish I’d make with an equivalent Indian dish and visa versa.

My children were finicky eaters when they were young. There was a New York Times Article in 2007 that explained how being a picky eater was a “genetic” trait. My children took after my husband who had also been a picky eater as a child and had outgrown this trait. At the time, my children’s main diet consisted of pasta with white sauce (no red sauce), chicken nuggets, and mac-n-cheese with a limited selection of vegetables. Being the foodies and cooks that both my husband and I are, we made countless attempts to try to get the children to sample new foods and to eat what we cooked for the adults at home but these efforts were in vain. Then one day my friend made Kheema matar, which is an Indian ground meat and pea dish. It is typically made with ground lamb but she had used ground beef that evening. She used beef because she knew I was not very fond of lamb. (who’s the finicky eater now!) The dish is beautifully seasoned with onion, garlic, ginger, hot pepper, cumin, ground coriander, cayenne pepper, and garam masala (more on this later).

Coriander, Cumin & Cayenne

To my surprise, my children ate the Kheema at her house that night. I don’t know why they ate it since it was so different to what they typically liked, was it that food always tastes better at other people’s houses, were they being polite and obedient and doing as they were told, or was it the magic combination of flavors that woke up their taste buds. Whatever it was, that Kheema dish was a turning point for our family. It marked the beginning of the changes in our home cooking and my children’s eating habits. I looked up my Madhur Jaffrey Indian cook book, made some adjustments to her Kheema Matar recipe, and made it a family staple. It opened up a whole new world of adventurous eating for my children and a gradual farewell to their culinary finickiness. It also made my life easier. I could now cook one meal for the whole family. And as many of you know, this is HUGE!! Sure, I initially hid some of the ingredients by blending or food processing them, something I no longer need to do. But even today, I have kept some of these techniques out of convenience. I prefer to food process a bunch of onion, garlic, and ginger than dice it.

We moved from Westport, CT to West Chester, PA and missed our friends terribly. We have visited each other over the years. We now live in London so it’s even harder to get together. The thing we missed the most was the spontaneity of our gatherings and the culinary experiences we shared.

So below I share my version of Kheema Matar. It is a recipe of delicious comfort food that brings back wonderful memories of our friends in Westport. It is a recipe of a meal that marked a pivotal moment for our family cooking and of the triumphant accomplishment of a mother who finally got her children to move beyond “white pasta”. Today, our 14 and 13-year-old children are foodies-in-training developing amazingly sophisticated palates. This makes my husband and I very happy because now the whole family can share and enjoy exciting culinary adventures together.

Kheema Matar by a Colombian

My cooking technique reflects more of an American/Colombian style. This dish is relatively mild but you can add more spice and more heat as you like. If you have never cooked “Indian”, this is a great introductory recipe.

Ingredients

Serves 6 – 8 (great as left overs)

  • ½ Large Onion (4 – 6 oz)
  • 7 – 8 garlic cloves
  • 1” – 1 ½“ of fresh ginger, peeled cut  into 4 pieces
  • ½  to 1 hot green or red pepper
  • 2 oz. of water
  • 2 Tbs Canola Oil
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ⅛ to ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 4 oz. of water
  • 2 lbs of Ground Meat (you can mix ground beef with ground chicken or turkey)
  • 10 oz. frozen peas defrosted ( I like to be generous with the peas)
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 – 2 lemons juiced (or limes if that is all you have)

Method 

  • Begin by making a paste with the first five ingredients.

Make a Paste with:
Onion, Garlic, Ginger, Hot Red Pepper, and Water

  • Then heat the oil, and stir fry the paste for 2 – 3 minutes.
  • Add the ground coriander, cumin, cayenne pepper, and sauté for 1 -2 minutes.
  • Add the additional 4 oz. of water and the ground meat.  Stir, bring to a boil, lower the temperature, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes.

The Paste with Ground Meat

  • Add the remaining ingredients, stir, and simmer for 10 more minutes.

Add peas, cilantro, garam masala, and salt.

Add the Lemon Juice

  • Adjust salt if needed.
  • Serve with white or Basmati rice.

Extra Tips

GingerI like to buy fresh ginger. With the skin on I cut the ginger into 1 ½ “ pieces. I wrap the individual pieces in plastic wrap, I place the pieces in a small freezer plastic bag and freeze them. When I am ready to use, I pull out however many pieces I need, I defrost them for a couple of minutes, peel, and prepare as needed. I always have fresh ginger available for use.

Cilantro: I buy a fresh bouquet of cilantro. I place it in a container with water as soon as I get home. I store it in the refrigerator. It keeps for up to two weeks. Remember to check the water level in the container.

SeasoningsYou should be able to find ground cumin, cayenne pepper, and ground coriander at a regular food store. However, garam masala is a special indian blend of spices that you may only find in an Indian store or specialty store. There are many types of garam masalas. A typical garam masala is a blend of spices like cardamom, cinnamon, cumin seeds, cloves, peppercorns, and nutmeg.  If you live in a big city you’ll have ample access to these more exotic ingredients. But do not fret, if you live in the US you can order spices from Penzey’s online.  http://www.penzeys.com/

RiceWe eat a lot of rice in our home. I love to use a rice cooker because I get perfect rice each time. I put the rice in the pot, add water, and salt and program the cooker for when I need my rice.

About picky eaters being a genetic trait:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/10/dining/10pick.html?pagewanted=all          

My Second Half Century – New Adventures

I have decided that my second half-century should be as exciting as my first half-century.  It was a year ago that with some trepidation I welcomed the big milestone of 50. My fifties would find me living overseas in London with my family. I would spend my whirlwind year settling into London living, doing lots of traveling, and making many new great friends. In retrospect, I have had a wonderful 50th year.

Maya and Me
At Hampstead Heath September 2012

Today, I am celebrating my 51st birthday.  I decided two weeks ago that I want the next 50 years to continue to be about “Firsts” and “New Adventures”. So I decided to join a women’s running group for beginners. I stay in relatively good shape by watching what I eat and exercising but I have never really run. I lost 30 pounds with weight watchers during college and it has been a lifetime goal to keep the weight off while still enjoying the pleasures of food and wine (and beer too). I have succeeded at this.  My exercise routine has varied over the years and has included gyms, group classes, and working out alone. I currently ride a recumbent bike at home and do enormous amounts of walking while living in London. I do recognize I need to add back some weight/toning exercises into my routine.

Several friends had tried the running group last year that culminated in doing a half-marathon in March of following year. I have to admit that: a) I felt very proud of them for their commitment to running and doing a half-marathon, and b) I felt a bit left out from a social perspective in not sharing in this special event. A couple of weeks ago, I cornered one of my friends and said to her, “I am on the fence about joining the running group, convince my why I should do it”. She did an amazing selling job. Within hours of our discussion I had joined the running group. Not only would I start running but I set the goal of running the half-marathon to be held in Bratislava, Slovakia next March.

Initially, I did not tell my family. I wanted to start the training to see how I would do and how my knees would hold up. Besides, they tease me all the time with, “Mommy runs like a girl”, hello… that’s what I thought I was, well a woman, but certainly my running style has not been very graceful during past attempts at making green lights. My family also teases me when I tell them that I used to play on the high school basketball team. The reason this is so hard for them to visualize is that I am all of 5 feet tall. However, it was a small school and they needed players. I had enthusiasm, which was just about all I had. My basketball career soon ended but was rekindled when I dreamt about 2 years ago that the Chicago Bulls and the Miami Heat were recruiting me to play with them. In the dream, I chose to play for the Miami Heat because the weather in Miami was warmer than in Chicago. At the time in real life, I was undergoing physical therapy for a shoulder injury I had incurred while doing intense yoga, go figure. I had probably spent too many hours at the physical therapist watching ESPN and watching basketball commentaries. Although, I’m not very athletic, I have skied since my mid-twenties. I vowed I would be skiing into my 90’s. Back in 2001, I felt knee pain and after a visit to a doctor and then to a physical therapist I learned that I had to strengthen my quadriceps muscles that supported my knees. I have succeeded at this and I have skied pain and trouble-free every year.

The night after my first running training, I shared the news with my family that I had joined the running group and that I was going to do a half-marathon.  I was overwhelmed by their amazing support. I expected them to tease me and instead they were all very proud of me. I relished in their positive support.  I am into my 4th week of running and I feel great. I have increased my quadriceps exercises and added stretching routines and other floor exercises. The beginner program starts out with a walk-run-walk routine that eventually has you running 130 consecutive minutes. Not only am I continuing to stay fit and working towards the goal of the half-marathon, but I’m also making wonderful new friends in the group. I have rediscovered that I am a very goal oriented person. I thrive if I have goals set in front of me and I thrive in social settings.

Curt’s Amazing Chicago Style Deep Dish Pizza

I could not feel happier on this special birthday (they are all special, by the way) I have a wonderful husband, son, and daughter. My husband is frosting a cake he baked for me as I type this posting, and is finishing up his delicious homemade Chicago Style deep-dish pizza for our celebration dinner. I have amazing parents, in-laws, and extended family. We all have our health. I also feel privileged to have some wonderful dear friends around the world. Oh, and let’s not forget my gorgeous, chocolate lab Maya who brightens up even the cloudiest of days. I am happy with who I am and grateful for what I have on this birthday. Here’s to turning 51, and to the next set of adventures that await me or better yet the adventures that I will seek out.

Celebrating my 51st Birthday with My Family
and with Curt’s Delicious Chocolate Cake
September 30, 2012

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to My Colonoscopy

I turned 50 last September so I hurried to schedule my first ever colonoscopy, a right of passage to celebrate the half century mark. This grand event took place this past July. Well I did what everyone else does the day before the procedure. I started the day with a clear liquid diet. I have to say, I enjoyed my black coffee with sugar, the powder bouillon chicken broth tasted delicious and the Jolly Ranchers were exquisite. I managed the hunger very well. I was motivated by getting the procedure over with and also losing a couple of pounds for weekend. I chose what I thought was the better of the two laxative treatments offered by my doctor. It involved drinking 32 ounces at a time in two sittings spread over 6 hours. It certainly sounded more appealing to drink 32 ounces at a time, then 64 ounces all at once which was the second option. The only problem was that drinking 32 ounces is still a lot of liquid and I was not thrilled knowing I had to repeat this process later that night. The stuff initially tasted ok, like a sugar-free aspartame energy drink, but after a couple of ounces of it, I started cringing with every gulp.

The Laxative Preparation

A friend had shared that she had not left her bedroom after taking the laxative.  I hunkered down in my bedroom and turned on the television. I delegated dinner cooking to my husband. This MOM was off duty. I then sat back, relaxed, and let the medicine do its work. I watched 6 back-to-back episodes of TLC’s Four Weddings, mindless entertainment but perfect for the occasion. Soon I had most of the family watching with me.

What was I thinking…

I had an adequate night of sleep. My procedure had been scheduled for 10:30 a.m. That morning I asked my husband if I should wear make-up to the procedure. What was I thinking, as if my husband knew of such things. But I’m the type of person who loves bouncing ideas off of people. I reviewed the procedure instructions and there was no mention of not wearing make-up. You see I love to always look very composed and made up, even if I’m going to the gym or my colonoscopy. So I went with a lighter version of the makeup. I arrived at the doctors and signed in. I said goodbye to my husband who would return for me 2 hours later.

So here’ how it started…

I switched into the lovely hospital gown that opens in the back and was lying on the hospital bed with a heap of blankets on top since I generally get very cold in these settings. The nurse came to attach an IV line. She first gave me a local anesthetic that felt like a small prick of a pin. And thank god for that local anesthetic, because she could not find the vein. She moved the needle in every direction she could, but still with no luck. I felt no pain, but certainly lots of uncomfortable tugging. She finally gave up and said that she would leave it to the anesthesiologist.  She told me she would not poke me more than once. Lucky me. So I sat there waiting for whatever would happen next.

And then the funny thing happened…

I saw a woman walking towards me, she was dressed like a nurse, she smiled and said (I have changed the names), “Hi, you may not remember me, I’m Susan Wright, David’s wife”. Sure enough, I remembered her. I had worked with her husband 26 years ago at General Electric. All I could think of was “Thank god, I wore my makeup, you just never know who you may run into”.  It’s much like your mother used to say, always wear good underwear, in case you are in an accident, and you have to be taken to the hospital and they see your undies.  The same goes with looking presentable for your colonoscopy. I was delighted to see Susan. We had exchanged holiday cards for all these past years but had not seen each other in person. She sat down and we chatted for while.  It just made my day.

Unfinished business…

The anesthesiologist came over and we greeted each other as he perused through my chart. Then he grabbed the bed to wheel me to the procedure and at about the same time that I was going to say something he realized I still needed an IV line. He was a master, he came over and without hesitation, inserted the needle directly into the vein and voilà I was ready for my Propofol.

Feeling Fabulous…

I was wheeled into the surgery room. I greeted my G.I. doctor and her nurse. My doctor, who by the way looks so very young, asked me how I felt. I told her I felt great and thought to myself, “and I look fabulous too ”.  The anesthesiologist hooked me up to the drugs and said, “Turn to your side”, the nurse said,  “Let me adjust your pillow”, and then it was like MAGIC… I woke up and it was all over. I heard a far away gentle voice offering me juice. I then very slowly got dressed back into my street clothes. Eventually, my friend Susan came over and escorted me to meet my husband. In groggy excitement I re-introduced Susan to my husband and we chatted for a bit. My husband knows how I relish in these surprise social encounters. And how fun to have had one on the way to my colonoscopy.

Thankfully, my test results were excellent. I don’t have to repeat this procedure for another 10 years. I will take this opportunity to share the following. If you are over 50 and have not had your first colonoscopy, then it’s time to schedule one. If you have family history of colon cancer please talk to you doctor about it and get a colonoscopy before age 50. I met a woman in Westport, CT who had lost not only her husband to colon cancer but her 28 year-old son as well. And sadly, I lost a childhood friend to colon cancer 2 years ago. She was only 44 years old, had family history of colon cancer, and sadly did not start early screenings.

I have a dear friend who gets very nervous with any type of medical procedure. She stresses out enormously going for annual PAP smears. She asked me how I manage to be so relaxed when it comes to these medical procedures. I don’t have a specific answer for her, except to let her know, that how I feel at any given time, can sometimes be linked with how I look. It’s like when I have a bad cold, the best thing to do is to get out of bed, shower, get dressed, and yes, put on my make up. Then somehow I start feeling better. Feeling fabulous may sometimes be connected to looking fabulous, even if looking fabulous is just in your head.

Feeling Fabulous in the Swiss Alps