Korea Town, NYC

Tucked away on 32nd street between 5th Avenue and Broadway in New York City is Korea Town. This is where my best friend from college took me to lunch yesterday. Mary immigrated to the United States from South Korea when she was 13 years old. We met as freshmen in college in the basement stacks of the library. The day we met she said to me that she wanted to major in astrophysics. We laugh now when we reminisce 37 years later, because as she puts it, “That was the major of the day”. She went on to become an architect and I became an electrical engineer.

Although Mary and I have very different cultural backgrounds, we share one very important characteristic: we are both immigrants to the United States. Over the years, our friendship has offered us the opportunity to learn about each other’s cultures. My friend is getting ready to move overseas so I quickly arranged a trip to see her before she leaves. After meeting me at the train station yesterday she took me to Korea Town. This visit gave me a newfound appreciation for our long-lasting and rich friendship. Our first stop was to the huge Korean food store, H-Mart, where Mary gave me a tour of all the sections.

The chili paste section

The chili paste section

The snack section

The snack section

Rice cakes that we would later enjoy in our soup.

Rice cakes that we would later enjoy in our soup.

She was in the market for Wasabi powder. However, as she approached the cashier she lit up when she saw the frozen treats freezer. She grabbed a red bean ice bar and said, “I grew up with these, let’s try this before lunch!”

Our purchases: Wasabi powder and red bean ice pop.

Our purchases: Wasabi powder and red bean ice pop.

I thought I would just take a bite but then she got a phone call and I held on to the bar while she talked, and by the time she finished her phone call I had managed to enjoy half the bar. The bar was was a mildly sweet refreshing custard with red beans interspersed throughout.

The yummy red bean ice pop.

The yummy red bean ice pop.

We then went to the Korean restaurant New Wonjo. The best part was letting my friend decide what we were having. We enjoyed a delicious spicy beef and vegetable stew called Yook Ge Jang and a milder dumpling and rice cake soup called DDUK Mandoo Guk.

The spicy beef and vegetable stew.

The spicy beef and vegetable stew.

Before the soups arrived they served us an assortment of kimchi (pickled vegetables), salads, and a dry fish. We ended our meal with a yummy cold cinnamon drink. What an amazing lunch!

Dumpling and Rice Cake soup.

Dumpling and Rice Cake soup.

 

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Little nibbles with lunch (Top left to right: green salad, garlic snapes with red pepper, broccoli, macaroni salad, Bottom left to right: root vegetable kimchi, cabbage kimchi, and dried fish)

The rest of our visit included a visit to fabric stores in New York City’s Garment district and a 45 block walk up-town to my friend’s place. The walk took us through Central Park where we stopped to see the tribute to John Lennon in Strawberry Fields. As always, it was a wonderful visit with an old friend which gave me a renewed sense of gratitude for our friendship.

I love everything international. I relish in meeting people from around the world and learning about their cultures. I feel this adds richness to my life. My friendship with Mary has added a wonderful dimension to my life. Exposure to different cultures leads to a better understanding and ultimately acceptance of those who are different.

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It is my hope for my children that they also have the opportunity to make friends from around the world. It is my continued hope that the United States continues to be a haven for immigrants from around the world because we all benefit from this.

Strawberry Fields, Tribute to John Lennon in Central Park

Strawberry Fields, Tribute to John Lennon in Central Park

Maybe it was not serendipity that our walk took us through Strawberry Fields. Maybe we needed to be reminded of John Lennon’s song, Imagine.

Imagine there’s no heaven
It’s easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today
Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace, you
You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will be as one
Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all the world, you
You may say I’m a dreamer
But I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will be as one
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Rediscovering a Friend

In life we meet many people that we like to refer to as “friends”, but the truth is that often we don’t take the time to really get to know them. This happened to me with an old colleague from business school. We were two of approximately 171 women in a graduating class of 780. Although we were “friends” we were more like comrades sharing an experience, supportive of each other yet not close enough to fully understand each other’s personal story. After graduation we both went our separate ways and lost contact. After 24 years I would have the opportunity to reconnect with Vera. She had just published a book and shared the information with some of her classmates. So, this summer I read her book and rediscovered an old friend in the process. After completing the book I knew I had to speak to Vera to fully understand the inspiration behind her novel, The Lonely American. Though it was written as fiction, I suspected there was much of Vera herself interwoven in the story, and it sparked a desire, almost a need to learn more. I spent three hours with Vera on the phone, not only catching up on life, but also delving into the historical period of her book from her perspective.

The Lonely American by Vera Lam

The Lonely American by Vera Lam

Vera was born and raised in Saigon, now known as Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. So naturally she chose to write a book inspired by her personal experiences with the Vietnam War, a time period that is of particular interest to me. To clarify, in Vietnam, “The Vietnam War” is referred to as “The American War”. Like many, I grew up in the 1960’s with current events of the Vietnam War playing out in television news and the papers yet I understood very little of it. Reading about the war in Stanley Karnow’s Pulitzer Prize winning book, Vietnam: A History, was an eye opener. It helped me understand the context, the players, and the actions of a war. When Vera told us about her new book, I was delighted to hear the news, and at the same time intrigued by the subject. The Lonely American delineates the life of an American pilot and his kindred connections to Vietnam. After serving two tours of duty, he returns to the US as a fully decorated officer. He marries his pre-war American sweetheart and has a son. However, he never forgets a woman he had met during his Vietnam years. Years later, as his treacherous life has driven him to complete solitude, he rediscovers his special love and connections to Vietnam. I don’t want to give the story away but suffice to say that it is a story that could have and may have happened to many. The characters personify the true historical experiences that so many have lived.

I wanted to dig deeper and asked Vera about her own personal story. As we spoke on the phone, I listened intently and scribbled pages and pages of notes. Listening to Vera’s story was like reading a novel. I appreciated her openness. Although she was happy for me to share her story I have respected her request to omit some of the events due to their delicate nature. After listening to Vera’s life experience I have a newfound respect and admiration for her.

The United States supported South Vietnam in their fight against communist North Vietnam. In January of 1973 all parties finally agreed to a cease-fire. The United States pulled its troops out leaving South Vietnam to deal with its fate. Many South Vietnamese refugees chose to leave their country when the US left. But leaving the country would become increasingly difficult especially if you did not have money or connections. Soon after, North Vietnam broke the cease-fire and resumed fighting, continuing its push to the south. South Vietnam, with no military aid from the US, was forced to surrender in 1975. In 1976, the country was officially united and called the Socialist Republic of Vietnam. This caused another exodus of South Vietnamese who chose to leave rather than live under communist regime.

So while I navigated the dramas of middle school and high school, watched The Six Million Dollar Man on television, and listened to Simon & Garfunkel on the radio, Vera was figuring out ways to leave Saigon in 1975. Since her father had been an ‘under cover special agent’ in South Vietnam for the Republic of China for more than two decades, he was blacklisted by the North Vietnamese. Though he had narrowly escaped by boat to the neighboring country of Thailand, Vera’s mother and her siblings were left behind. They were subsequently placed under house arrest for several months. In time, Vera obtained a pass that allowed her to leave communist Vietnam and move to Paris. After having lived through the aftermath of the war and all of its insecurities, Vera understood the importance and need for establishing “security” in her life. She decided it was time to go to America to study engineering. She believed education was the equalizer in society. In 1979, with her unstoppable resolve, Vera moved to LA and began her studies in a community college. In 1981, Vera’s family finally joined her in the United States. She would go on to win a full scholarship to the University of Southern California where she earned a degree in computer engineering in 1984. After graduating from USC, Vera started working for AT&T Bell Laboratories. Soon after, Vera’s path would cross with mine. She and I met in Boston at Harvard Business School in 1988. After graduating from HBS, she would go on to have a very successful career in business. And lucky for us that she would get inspired to write “The Lonely American”.

In writing her book, Vera wanted to express the “things” that are important to her. She wanted to remind people of the horrors of war because as she says, “we have such short memories”. In June of 2014 the UN Refugee Agency reported that the number of refugees, asylum-seekers, and internally displaced people worldwide due to conflicts exceeded 50 million people for the first time since the end of World War II. Pulling a direct quote from her book, “Bullets have no eyes”, Vera wanted to remind us that many of the victims of war are the innocent bystanders. She iterated the importance of our understanding foreign policy because it will undoubtedly impact us one way or another. Towards the end of our telephone conversation, Vera mentioned that she had bore grudges against her own family members, but later recognized the power of forgiving.

I am very impassioned with the topic of mentoring others and serving as a role model. My “rediscovered” friend is a true inspiration for the next generation. She is an inspiration, not just for young women, but also for all young people around the world living in conflict. Vera’s determination proves to us once again that we are the ones that make the choices in our lives that can alter our destiny in a positive way.

I invite you to read “The Lonely American” by Vera Lam, my friend. http://www.amazon.com/The-Lonely-American-Vera-Lam/dp/9573909111/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1410626853&sr=8-2&keywords=the+lonely+american

The UN Refugee Agency Report June 2014 http://www.unhcr.org/53a155bc6.html

For historical background read Stanley Karnow’s Vietnam A History http://www.amazon.com/Vietnam-History-Stanley-Karnow/dp/0140265473/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1415295380&sr=8-1&keywords=stanley+karnows

The Special People Who Cross Our Paths

The People Who Cross Our Paths

The Special People Who Cross Our Paths

People cross our path every moment of our lives. Time and again, I have proven to myself that these encounters are not random but that these people enter our lives for special and unique reasons. I was recently asked to contribute a story for my friend’s 60th birthday celebration. I like to say that the universe sent me this special person at a moment in my life when I needed her the most.

In 1997, my husband and I were getting ready to move to Brussels, Belgium with his job. Not only were we excited about the expat opportunity, we were finally expecting our first child. During the week that the movers were packing our household goods, we received what seemed at the time the tragic news that our baby would need corrective plastic surgeries after his birth. We would arrive in a foreign land with no friends and family to deal with this challenge. Fortunately, my husband and I had each other and together we would begin to educate ourselves on the future medical needs of our baby. Our son was born in Brussels on his official due date of Christmas Eve, December 24, 1997. After researching doctors in the United States and in Belgium we chose to stay in Brussels for our son’s surgeries. His first surgery was scheduled for March of 1998 at the tender age of 2 months. I was very fortunate to have my mother come stay with us for the three months between my son’s birth and his first surgery. She was a huge support during that difficult time. The time between my son’s birth and his surgery remains a blur. I spent most of the time anticipating the surgical procedure while prioritizing his medical requirements. My husband, my mother, and I tried to maintain the semblance of a normal life. Together with my son, my mother and I would get out of the house and visit public places. We would often feel the glaring eyes of strangers staring at my son, pointing their fingers, and making comments in Flemish or French alluding to his condition. We tried to be courageous and ignore these people while moving on as naturally as we could. In hindsight, it was a very emotional time for us all.

One day my mother and I were at the tea room of the American Women’s Club of Brussels. We were having lunch and my son was quietly laying in his car seat on the floor between us. This was still before his surgery. All of a sudden this cheerful outgoing American lady showed up out of nowhere and said something like “Oh my word, he is so beautiful!” as she scooped my son into her arms without hesitation. Those words resonated in my head. Someone had called my baby beautiful. I had been so overwhelmed with my son’s medical needs, his day-to-day care, as well as blaming myself for what had happened, that I had not acknowledged to myself that he was indeed, BEAUTIFUL! It would take this complete stranger, an angel crossing my path, to reach my soul with such a powerful statement. And so this person would enter our lives. She was the friend that both my mother and I desperately needed at that time. She embraced us with her laughter, support, and friendship. Little did she know that the universe had sent her to us that afternoon, because we were all in need of some tender loving care and she was just the right person for the job! She has remained a dear friend. Our children call her Tia which means aunt in Spanish. So on this joyous 60th birthday celebration I wanted her to know how grateful I still am for that moment when she not only crossed my path, she joined it, sharing her love and friendship throughout these years and more importantly for being there at one of the most difficult times in my life. And proving once again that people enter our lives for very special reasons.

I hope that you too have someone special cross your path. I also hope that someday you serve as someone’s special person on their path.

Awaiting those special people who cross our path. Awaiting to cross someone's path.

Awaiting those special people who cross our path.
Awaiting to cross someone’s path.

Tía Mary’s Korean Korokkes (Croquettes)

Korean Korokkes

Korean Korokkes

Mary is my best friend from college. Mary, born in Korea, came to the United States when she was 12 years old. We took physics and drafting classes together at Queens College in New York City circa 1980. In 1984, I started my first job at GE in Schenectady, NY and she transferred to RPI only a few miles away in Troy, NY. We skied every weekend and hosted parties together.

Friends Cooking Together

Friends Cooking Together in 2008

She made her delicious Korean Korokkes or croquettes for one of our many social events. They were a huge success. We continued our friendship over the years. In 2008, Tia Mary (tia means aunt in Spanish), as my children have come to call her, made her Korean Korokkes again, but this time for our family. Tia Mary’s Korean Korokkes would become an instant hit with my children. So when Mary planned a recent visit, the first request from my children was for Tia Mary’s Korean Croquettes. And so a new food tradition was born in our family, cooking Korean Korokkes with our dear friend Tia Mary. With today’s healthy food trends, these croquettes would be frowned upon because they are fried. But my philosophy with food is everything can be enjoyed in moderation.

My daughter helping Tia Mary in 2008

My daughter helping Tia Mary in 2008

My daughter working side  by side with Tia Mary

My daughter working side by side with Tia Mary in October 2013

Tía Mary’s Korean Korokkes

Note about equipment: We fry our croquettes in a deep fryer however you can also fry them in a regular pan filled with enough canola oil to cover the croquettes.

Makes approximately 58 croquettes (2 ¼ inch by 1 ¼ inch croquettes shaped like logs)

Ingredients

  • Canola oil for frying
  • 1 lb of ground meat
  • 1 lb or 3 medium yellow onions finely chopped (2 ¾ cup to 3 cups of chopped onion)
  • 3 lbs of potatoes peeled, cooked, and mashed
  • 4 – 6 Tbs flour (or more as needed) in a container for dredging the croquettes
  • 2 – 3 eggs beaten and placed in a container for dipping
  • Breadcrumbs in a container for rolling the croquettes
  • Salt and Pepper to taste
  • Tonkatsu sauce for dipping. Tonkatsu is a sweet and spicy Japanese sauce. Bull-Dog is a popular Japanese brand available in stores or on-line

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Preparation

  • Heat oil in deep fryer or pan to 350°– 375° Fahrenheit
  • Sauté the onions until well cooked but not brown. Salt and pepper to taste.
  • Brown the meat. Salt and pepper to taste
  • Mash the potatoes. Salt and pepper to taste
  • Combine onions, meat, and potatoes. Adjust salt and pepper.
  • Set up an assembly line as follows: Bowl with meat and potato mix, container with   flour, bowl with beaten eggs, container with breadcrumbs, and empty tray.

    Form croquette and dredge in flour

    Form croquette and dredge in flour

  • Form a croquette by shaping into a small log approximately 2 ¼ inch long by 1 ¼ inch thick.
  • Dredge the croquette in the flour. Shake off excess flour.
  • Dip the croquette in the egg mixture.
  • Roll the croquette in the bread crumb mixture and set aside on tray.
  • Assemble the rest of the croquettes.

    Dip croquette in egg mixture and roll in breadcrumbs.

    Dip croquette in egg mixture and roll in breadcrumbs.

  • Start frying croquettes a few at a time. Do not crowd croquettes in pan or deep fryer. Drain on paper towel.
  • Complete frying all of the croquettes.
Korean Korokkes Assembly Line

Korean Korokkes Assembly Line

Serve korokkes warm or room temperature with Tonkatsu dipping sauce

Ready to Eat

Ready to Eat

Additional Comments:

The Korean Croquettes freeze very well. When ready to eat, defrost. Reheat about 8 at a time by microwaving for 1 minute then placing them in a toaster oven set at 400° as needed.

For homemade Tonkatsu sauce visit:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/09/tonkatsu-sauce-japanese-barbecue-recipe.html

http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Tonkatsu-Sauce

Happy Mother’s Day to My Friend Consuelo

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I met Consuelo two years ago when I first moved to London. The name “Consuelo” means comfort or consolation in Spanish. We met while walking our dogs in our neighborhood. She is a nanny for a family with two children and a handsome black Labrador Retriever. Her dog and mine took an instant liking to each other. Her dog is 11 years old and still looks very youthful. Consuelo shared that the secret for her dog’s youthful look and good health was that she had fed him freshly cooked chicken and rice since he was a puppy. Spoiled boy!  Consuelo shared that she had moved from her native Ecuador to London over 30 years ago. So we had always chatted in Spanish. Over the months, we would run into each other with our dogs. Most of the time Consuelo would be pushing a stroller with an adorable little girl who is now 3 years old. One weekend afternoon I ran into Consuelo with the family that she works for and I found out that their older son had severe disabilities. Consuelo also cared for this little boy.

The months would go by and we would continue to meet each other and share pleasantries on the street. Then Friday morning was a special day. I was on my way to a coffee gathering when I ran into her with the little girl. We said our hellos and the cute little girl who recognizes me gave me a huge smile. It turned out we were walking in the same direction so off we went to the St. John’s Wood high street and chatted for about 15 minutes.

She would share so much in just those 15 minutes. She would open up in such a way that even she surprised herself. I asked how the little boy that she watches was. She said he was doing ok. She shared that it is always so challenging to take care of his needs. It is an exhausting job for both the parents and Consuelo. I told her I so admired her patience in dealing with the boy. My friend commented that she is always so concerned when they hire a babysitter for when Consuelo cannot be there. Consuelo will review a thousand things with the new sitter to ensure he is well taken care of. You can tell she is very protective of him. One day last week, Consuelo was preparing the boy for a bath. The boy is about 7 or 8 years old. As Consuelo lifted him to put him in his bath, he turned his face, and he placed his open mouth on her cheek in what appeared to be an attempt to kiss her. She was so moved because it was his first attempt at kissing and of showing any signs of affection. Consuelo could not believe it, and even as she recounted the story she was filled with goose bumps. The little boy had not even done this with his own mother. I said to Consuelo, “That little boy loves you so much. He must sense and recognize your dedication to him.” The outside world only sees the boy’s disabilities and suffering, while Consuelo focuses on improving his quality of life while showering him with love and affection.

Consuelo then shared that she and her husband were expecting a grandchild. I congratulated her and asked if it was their first one. She said it wasn’t but that it was the first girl and she was obviously very excited. She said her oldest grandson was 11 years old. She was delighted to share that her grandson had just been awarded a full scholarship for the rest of his education in London. She commented that the family was very pleased with this since her son had limited financial resources. As we walked further, she turned and said, “You see my son is disabled, he’s been in a wheel chair since he was a child”. She went on to tell me some wonderful stories about her son and how he has tried to live independently and support his family. I asked her if he was the reason why they had left Ecuador and she said yes. Her son would not have had much of a future in her native country back then.

I turned to Consuelo and I said something like, “Dios te escogió para este labor por una razón muy especial”, which translates into “God hand picked you for this task for a very special reason”. I could not get over the fact that after raising her own disabled child she would find the fortitude and patience to repeat the whole experience all over again by helping raise another family’s child with special needs.

We arrived at the high street and were getting ready to say our goodbyes. But she had one more story to share. She told me how her son had adapted a vehicle that allowed him to store his wheel chair on the roof and was therefore able to drive everywhere. It pleases him very much that he can transport his own family. You could sense how proud she is of her son. No doubt her son gets a lot of his “can do” attitude from his mother who through her example taught him to never give up. Consuelo continues to share this love and perseverance with the children she watches. And in return those children adore her not just as a caregiver or nanny but also more like a grandmother. Not to mention the family dog who also adores her because she showers him with love and attention too, oh and with freshly cooked chicken and rice, as well!

My heart filled with such joy to have met Consuelo and to have run into her on that particular Friday morning. I turned to her and said, “I must hug you”, and I did. She thanked me for listening to her and said she shared these stories with me because she felt I was a special person. I was very moved. We said “Hasta Luego” (See You Later) and went in our different directions. It may be the last time I run into her since I will be moving back to the US. I often wonder why people’s paths cross. I like to think that it is not just coincidence but that somehow it is meant to be, that there is a reason for it. Even if it is just to say, I am so proud to have known such a special person and role model like Consuelo.

Happy Mother’s Day

Colombian Kheema Matar

 

Kheema Matar – Ground (Minced) Meat and Peas

A Story of Food, Friendship, and Finicky Eaters

When we lived in Westport, CT one of our dearest and closest friends were from India. We spent countless evenings talking, laughing, dancing, drinking, and mainly eating. Some gatherings were planned and others were very spontaneous. We would telephone each other and the next thing we knew we would have planned a feast of Indian, Colombian, and/or American foods with whatever ingredients were in our houses. The beauty of having friends from different cultures is that as we get to know each other we come to the realization that we have much more in common than we think. As my girlfriend and I cooked together we realized how similar Colombian and Indian food was. Sure, there were differences, but more often than not, she would identify a Colombian dish I’d make with an equivalent Indian dish and visa versa.

My children were finicky eaters when they were young. There was a New York Times Article in 2007 that explained how being a picky eater was a “genetic” trait. My children took after my husband who had also been a picky eater as a child and had outgrown this trait. At the time, my children’s main diet consisted of pasta with white sauce (no red sauce), chicken nuggets, and mac-n-cheese with a limited selection of vegetables. Being the foodies and cooks that both my husband and I are, we made countless attempts to try to get the children to sample new foods and to eat what we cooked for the adults at home but these efforts were in vain. Then one day my friend made Kheema matar, which is an Indian ground meat and pea dish. It is typically made with ground lamb but she had used ground beef that evening. She used beef because she knew I was not very fond of lamb. (who’s the finicky eater now!) The dish is beautifully seasoned with onion, garlic, ginger, hot pepper, cumin, ground coriander, cayenne pepper, and garam masala (more on this later).

Coriander, Cumin & Cayenne

To my surprise, my children ate the Kheema at her house that night. I don’t know why they ate it since it was so different to what they typically liked, was it that food always tastes better at other people’s houses, were they being polite and obedient and doing as they were told, or was it the magic combination of flavors that woke up their taste buds. Whatever it was, that Kheema dish was a turning point for our family. It marked the beginning of the changes in our home cooking and my children’s eating habits. I looked up my Madhur Jaffrey Indian cook book, made some adjustments to her Kheema Matar recipe, and made it a family staple. It opened up a whole new world of adventurous eating for my children and a gradual farewell to their culinary finickiness. It also made my life easier. I could now cook one meal for the whole family. And as many of you know, this is HUGE!! Sure, I initially hid some of the ingredients by blending or food processing them, something I no longer need to do. But even today, I have kept some of these techniques out of convenience. I prefer to food process a bunch of onion, garlic, and ginger than dice it.

We moved from Westport, CT to West Chester, PA and missed our friends terribly. We have visited each other over the years. We now live in London so it’s even harder to get together. The thing we missed the most was the spontaneity of our gatherings and the culinary experiences we shared.

So below I share my version of Kheema Matar. It is a recipe of delicious comfort food that brings back wonderful memories of our friends in Westport. It is a recipe of a meal that marked a pivotal moment for our family cooking and of the triumphant accomplishment of a mother who finally got her children to move beyond “white pasta”. Today, our 14 and 13-year-old children are foodies-in-training developing amazingly sophisticated palates. This makes my husband and I very happy because now the whole family can share and enjoy exciting culinary adventures together.

Kheema Matar by a Colombian

My cooking technique reflects more of an American/Colombian style. This dish is relatively mild but you can add more spice and more heat as you like. If you have never cooked “Indian”, this is a great introductory recipe.

Ingredients

Serves 6 – 8 (great as left overs)

  • ½ Large Onion (4 – 6 oz)
  • 7 – 8 garlic cloves
  • 1” – 1 ½“ of fresh ginger, peeled cut  into 4 pieces
  • ½  to 1 hot green or red pepper
  • 2 oz. of water
  • 2 Tbs Canola Oil
  • 1 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ⅛ to ¼ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 4 oz. of water
  • 2 lbs of Ground Meat (you can mix ground beef with ground chicken or turkey)
  • 10 oz. frozen peas defrosted ( I like to be generous with the peas)
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 ½ tsp salt
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 1 – 2 lemons juiced (or limes if that is all you have)

Method 

  • Begin by making a paste with the first five ingredients.

Make a Paste with:
Onion, Garlic, Ginger, Hot Red Pepper, and Water

  • Then heat the oil, and stir fry the paste for 2 – 3 minutes.
  • Add the ground coriander, cumin, cayenne pepper, and sauté for 1 -2 minutes.
  • Add the additional 4 oz. of water and the ground meat.  Stir, bring to a boil, lower the temperature, cover, and simmer for 30 minutes.

The Paste with Ground Meat

  • Add the remaining ingredients, stir, and simmer for 10 more minutes.

Add peas, cilantro, garam masala, and salt.

Add the Lemon Juice

  • Adjust salt if needed.
  • Serve with white or Basmati rice.

Extra Tips

GingerI like to buy fresh ginger. With the skin on I cut the ginger into 1 ½ “ pieces. I wrap the individual pieces in plastic wrap, I place the pieces in a small freezer plastic bag and freeze them. When I am ready to use, I pull out however many pieces I need, I defrost them for a couple of minutes, peel, and prepare as needed. I always have fresh ginger available for use.

Cilantro: I buy a fresh bouquet of cilantro. I place it in a container with water as soon as I get home. I store it in the refrigerator. It keeps for up to two weeks. Remember to check the water level in the container.

SeasoningsYou should be able to find ground cumin, cayenne pepper, and ground coriander at a regular food store. However, garam masala is a special indian blend of spices that you may only find in an Indian store or specialty store. There are many types of garam masalas. A typical garam masala is a blend of spices like cardamom, cinnamon, cumin seeds, cloves, peppercorns, and nutmeg.  If you live in a big city you’ll have ample access to these more exotic ingredients. But do not fret, if you live in the US you can order spices from Penzey’s online.  http://www.penzeys.com/

RiceWe eat a lot of rice in our home. I love to use a rice cooker because I get perfect rice each time. I put the rice in the pot, add water, and salt and program the cooker for when I need my rice.

About picky eaters being a genetic trait:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/10/dining/10pick.html?pagewanted=all